Blues for Charlie – on reading the last Resnick

We go back a fair few years, Charlie and me. Pretty much instant, the connection, the attraction too.  We had things in common – places (though I lived near Nottingham as a teenager, so my Nottingham wasn’t his – it was the Playhouse, Goose Fair, the City Ground, and the shops), music (listening to Miles as I write this), cats (ours was called Mingus. RIP), football (I was on the Trent End, still loyal to the Reds to this day, glory days long past, whilst he’s a County man).

Never very lucky in love, our Charlie. But attractive to women, no question.  That crumpled, rumpled melancholy hard to resist – had we met in person, I’d have spectacularly failed to do so – but making it work in the long term, a lot tougher.  He nearly found that, so very nearly, and it broke my heart when…  but I won’t say, in case you don’t know, and if you don’t, you need to go back, as I’ve just done, to Lonely Hearts, and make his acquaintance for yourself, and follow him through the years, through to Darkness, Darkness.

I won’t say much about Darkness, Darkness, except that, as so many reviewers have already said, it’s a fitting coda to the series.  It focuses on the miners’ strike – an event which still reverberates in Nottinghamshire and South Yorkshire, so that Nottingham football supporters still get called scabs by Yorkshire football supporters, though in both cases their parents were toddlers, if that,  at the time of the strike – but it encompasses so much more.  It’s an elegy really, a blues for Charlie.

darkness darkness

So many of the cops whose investigations we follow on screen or on the page seem to be constructed according to a formula.  A bit of (preferably traumatic) back story, a few quirks (an addiction, past or current, an obsession), and a tendency to go off piste, to break the rules.  That can work – Rachel Bailey comes storming off the screen and the page (in Cath Staincliffe’s excellent novels) and into real life, so that when she (inevitably) does something monumentally daft, we, along with her long-suffering colleagues and friends, want to yell at her, shake her into common sense.  The best ones, the ones we re-read even when we remember exactly who dunnit, where, why and how, turn that formula into someone we can invest in, not just in their ability to put the bad guy behind bars, but in their humanity, their vulnerability, their emotional life. And Charlie is one of the best, no question.    Of course he has a back story (a broken marriage, nothing out of the ordinary), and a few quirks (his tendency to wear his most recent meal on his shirt front or his tie, for example).  But he’s a rounded (and that’s not a crack about his waistline), nuanced, complicated character,

And so many of the narratives of crime and punishment that we consume rely on convoluted plots – plots not just in the sense of the narrative arc,  but machinations, devilishly clever serial killers, hidden identities, etc.  All very enjoyable, but bearing, one imagines, little relation to the day to day of policing.  We suspend our disbelief, accept for the duration that in the picture postcard villages of Midsomer a deranged serial killer lurks behind every cottage doorway, or that the academics of Oxford are busier plotting their next murder than preparing their next research bid.   The volume and the type of crime here is a tad more realistic, Charlie’s cases are more likely to involve cock-ups than conspiracies, individuals with chaotic lives committing chaotic crimes, often with consequences they could never have imagined.  It’s not that there aren’t any serial killers, or any conspiracies, but they are interwoven with the mundanity, the banality, of ‘normal’ urban crime.

The other trope that those of us who watch the detectives can get a bit weary of, or even sickened by, is the reliance on sexual violence as a plot device.  Again, this does feature in Charlie’s caseload over the years, as you’d expect.  But there’s nothing sexy, nothing titillating here.  The reality of rape and the fear of rape, the murky areas of human sexuality, the casual violence of language used towards women, are all shown clear-sightedly and compassionately, through Charlie’s eyes.  It’s not that he’s so very PC.   But his attractiveness to women isn’t just about his crumpled melancholy, it’s about his instinctive respect, his empathy.  Even when he’s getting it wrong (as he does, often), fundamentally he’s a good man, someone you could lean on, trust.  Those murky areas, and how fiction deals with them, are not just sub-text either – in both Living Proof and Still Water we confront them head on.

There’s so much humanity in these stories.  And there’s music of course, flowing through them.  There’s Millington’s regular assaults on the Petula Clark songbook, the bands at the Polish Club where Charlie dances with Marian, or the Otis Redding track that was playing when he met Elaine… But it’s the jazz that’s vital.  It’s integral, it’s the atmosphere, those blue notes echoing Charlie’s melancholy, bringing out the noir on Nottingham’s mean streets. It’s the soundtrack to what we see of his life, to the daily grappling with petty crime, dysfunctional families, and the viciousness and brutality of which human beings are capable, and with the politics of policing, the admin, the power play.  He goes home, and he finds a record, a track, that echoes his mood and as the music is described we can almost believe we’re hearing it too, the descriptions so vivid, so perceptive.

And so it seemed fitting, as I re-read the books, focusing less on the plot and more on the atmosphere, the background, the soundtrack, to put together a little playlist.  One song for each novel.  I hope Charlie would approve.

‘He’ll be okay.  He’s got a flat white and yet another version of ‘Blue Monk’ to keep him warm’ (Darkness, Darkness, p. 416).

I’ll not worry about him then, and lord knows I have done sometimes, wondering if the sadness and the loneliness in him would take him over.  But he’ll be okay.  Cheers Charlie.

A Resnick playlist

Lonely Hearts (1989)  Billie Holiday – (I don’t stand a) Ghost of a Chance (with you) (Music for Torching, 1955)

Rough Treatment (1990) Red Rodney Quintet – Shaw ‘Nuff (Red Rodney Returns, 1959)

Cutting Edge (1991) Art Pepper – Straight Life (Straight Life, 1979)

Off Minor  (1992)  Thelonious Monk – Off Minor (Monk’s Music, 1957)

Wasted Years  (1993) Thelonious Monk – Evidence (Thelonious Monk at the Blackhawk, 1960)

Cold Light  (1994) Duke Ellington Orchestra – Cottontail (The Carnegie Hall Concerts, 1943)

Living Proof  (1995) Stan Tracey Duo – Some Other Blues (Live at the QEH, 1994)

Easy Meat  (1996) Billie Holiday – Body and Soul (Body and Soul, 1957)

Still Water  (1997) Miles Davis – Bag’s Groove (Bag’s Groove, 1957)

Last Rites  (1998)  Sandy Brown – In the Evening (In the Evening, 1970)

Cold in Hand  (2008) Bessie Smith – Cold in Hand Blues (1925, The Bessie Smith Story, Vol. 3, 1951)

Darkness Darkness (2014) Thelonious Monk – Blue Monk (Thelonious Monk Trio, 1954)

 

 

http://www.arbeale.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/thanks-john-and-charlie-for-great.html

http://mellotone.co.uk/resnick/

http://mellotone70up.wordpress.com/

http://www.nottinghampost.com/Author-John-Harvey-interview-Resnick-s-case/story-21089007-detail/story.html

http://www.crimetime.co.uk/mag/index.php/showarticle/7376

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